Last edited by Branris
Friday, May 15, 2020 | History

2 edition of We ain"t what we ought to be found in the catalog.

We ain"t what we ought to be

Stephen G. N. Tuck

We ain"t what we ought to be

the Black freedom struggle, from emancipation to Obama

by Stephen G. N. Tuck

  • 131 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by Belknap Press of Harvard University Press in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [421]-477) and index.

StatementStephen Tuck
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE185 .T797 2010
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 494 p., [24] p. of plates :
Number of Pages494
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24574439M
ISBN 109780674036260
LC Control Number2009035237
OCLC/WorldCa319493060

Our July Selection: We Ain’t What We Ought By Stephen Tuck In this exciting revisionist history, Stephen Tuck traces the black freedom struggle in all its diversity, from the first years of freedom during the Civil War to President Obama’s inauguration. As it moves from popular culture to high politics, from the Deep South.   “Everyone will be forgotten, nothing we do will make any difference, and all good endeavours, even the best, will come to naught. Unless there is God. If the God of the Bible exists, and there is a True Reality beneath and behind this one, and this life is not the only life, then every good endeavour, even the simplest ones, pursued in.

We Ain\'t What We Ought To Be rejects the traditional narrative that identifies the Southern non-violent civil rights movement as the focal point of the black freedom struggle. Instead, it explores the dynamic relationships between those seeking new freedoms and those looking to preserve racial hierarchies, and between grassroots activists and national leaders.   Museum Finds Recording Of Martin Luther King Jr. Speech Curators and interns at the New York State Museum were digging through their audio archives in .

Get this from a library! We ain't what we ought to be: the Black freedom struggle, from emancipation to Obama. [Stephen G N Tuck] -- In this book the author traces the black freedom struggle in all its diversity, from the first years of freedom during the Civil War to President Obama's inauguration. As it moves from popular. We ain't got nothing to say to you at all. We know what we got, and we don't care whether you know it or not. So maybe you better jus' scatter along now, 'cause Curley maybe ain't gonna like his.


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We ain"t what we ought to be by Stephen G. N. Tuck Download PDF EPUB FB2

“ We Ain't What We Ought To Be is a provocative and important book that deftly probes both the certainties and the ambiguities of the unending struggles of everyday people for social justice and an end to racism.” ― Darlene Clark Hine, Former President, the Organization of American Historians, and the Southern Historical AssociationCited by: We Ain't What We Ought to Be book.

Read reviews from world’s largest community We aint what we ought to be book readers. In this exciting revisionist history, Stephen Tuck traces the /5. We Ain't What We Ought To Be rejects the traditional narrative that identifies the Southern non-violent civil rights movement as the focal point of the black freedom struggle.

Instead, it explores the dynamic relationships between those seeking new freedoms and those looking to preserve racial hierarchies, and between grassroots activists and national leaders.

“ We Ain’t What We Ought To Be is a provocative and important book that deftly probes both the certainties and the ambiguities of the unending struggles of everyday people for social justice and an end to racism. As the author points out in his prologue, We Ain't What We Ought To Be is a book for both the general reader and the specialist.

Stephen Tuck has successfully tackled and tamed a beast of a topic. Stephen Tuck has successfully tackled and tamed a beast of a topic.

We Ain't What We Ought To Be rejects the traditional narrative that identifies the Southern non-violent civil rights movement as the focal point of the black freedom struggle. Instead, it explores Reviews: 1.

We Ain't What We Ought To Be is a provocative and important book that deftly probes both the certainties and the ambiguities of the unending struggles of everyday people for social justice and an end to racismDarlene Clark Hine, Former President, the Organization of American Historians, and the Southern Historical Association/5(3).

Martin Luther King Jr. — ‘We ain't what we oughta be. We ain't what we want to be. We ain't what we gonna be. But, thank God, we ain't what we was.’.

Mr. King ended his Hawaii speech by quoting a prayer from a preacher who had once been a slave, and it’s an apt description of the idea of America today: “We ain’t what we ought to be; we ain’t what we gonna be, but, thank God, we ain’t what we was.”Views: K.

We usually conclude the period of meditation with a prayer that we be shown all through the day what our next step is to be, that we be given whatever we need to take care of such problems. We ask especially for freedom from self-will, and are careful to make no request for ourselves only.

Buy a cheap copy of We Aint What We Ought To Be: The Black book by Stephen Tuck. In this exciting revisionist history, Stephen Tuck traces the black freedom struggle in all its diversity, from the first years of freedom during the Civil War to Free shipping over $ His second book, We Ain't What We Ought to Be: The Black Freedom Struggle from Emancipation to Obama, tracks the black freedom struggle over five decades.

In The Georgia Historical Quarterly, professor Douglas Flamming of the Georgia Institute of Technology praised it as. We Ain't What We Ought To Be rejects the traditional narrative that identifies the Southern non-violent civil rights movement as the focal point of the black freedom struggle.

Instead, it explores the dynamic relationships between those seeking new freedoms and those looking to preserve racial hierarchies, and between grassroots activists and Author: Stephen Tuck.

"We Ain't What We Ought To Be" rejects the traditional narrative that identifies the Southern non-violent civil rights movement as the focal point of the black freedom struggle. Instead, it explores the dynamic relationships between those seeking new freedoms and those looking to preserve racial hierarchies, and between grassroots activists and national leaders/5(3).

We Ain't What We Ought To Be rejects the traditional narrative that identifies the Southern non-violent civil rights movement as the focal point of the black freedom struggle. Instead, it explores the dynamic relationships between those seeking new freedoms and those looking to preserve racial hierarchies, and between grassroots activists and national leaders.

We Ain't What We Ought To Be rejects the traditional narrative that identifies the Southern non-violent civil rights movement as the focal point of the black freedom struggle. Instead, it explores the dynamic relationships between those seeking new freedoms and those looking to preserve racial hierarchies, and between grassroots activists and national leaders/5(35).

We Ain't What We Ought to Be: The Black Freedom Struggle from Emancipation to Obama Stephen Tuck, Author. Harvard Univ. $ (p) ISBN MORE BOOKS YOU'D LIKE. We ain't what we ought to be: the Black freedom struggle from emancipation to Obama. Preface Add to My Bookmarks Export citation.

Type Book Author(s) Stephen G. Tuck Date Publisher Belknap Press of Harvard University Press Pub place Cambridge, Mass ISBNWe aren’t what we ought to be.

We aren’t what we’re going to be. We aren’t what we want to be. But, thank God, we aren’t what we were. We Ain't What We Ought To Be: the Black Freedom Struggle, From Emancipation to Obama. Add to My Bookmarks Export citation. Type Book Author(s) Stephen G.

Tuck Date Publisher Belknap Press of Harvard University Press Pub place Cambridge, Mass, London ISBN. We Ain't What We Ought to Be (Hardcover) The Black Freedom Struggle from Emancipation to Obama. By Stephen Tuck. Belknap Press,pp.

Publication Date: January 1, Other Editions of This Title: Paperback (10/17/).Get FREE shipping on We Ain't What We Ought To Be by Stephen Tuck, from In this exciting revisionist history, Stephen Tuck traces the black freedom struggle in all its diversity, from the first years of freedom during the Civil War to President Obama's inauguration.

As Brand: Harvard University Press.A classic novella by Nobel Prize-winning author John Steinbeck, Of Mice and Men tells the story of migrant ranch workers George Milton and Lennie Small and their struggles to.