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2 edition of Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation investments on diarrhoeal diseases found in the catalog.

Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation investments on diarrhoeal diseases

Deborah Blum

Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation investments on diarrhoeal diseases

problems of methodology.

by Deborah Blum

  • 133 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Taken from International journal of epidemiology, vol.12, 1983, pp. 357-365.

SeriesInternational journal of epidemiology -- v.12
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20720425M

Interventions for the control of diarrhoeal diseases among young children: improving water supplies and excreta disposal facilities. Bull World Health Organ. ; 63 (4)– [PMC free article] Blum D, Feachem RG. Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation investments on diarrhoeal diseases: problems of methodology. Int J by: 7. A review of the published literature on the impact of water supply and/or excreta disposal facilities on diarrhoeal diseases, or on infections related to diarrhoea, reveals several methodological.

The book covers technical, social and financial aspects of water supply and sanitation and is an invaluable introductory text for undergraduate students, postgraduate researchers who are engaging.   Abstract. BACKGROUND: Cholera spread to Latin America in ; subsequently, cholera vaccination was considered as an interim intervention until long-term solutions involving improved water supplies and sanitation could be introduced. Measuring the Impact of Water Supply and Sanitation Investments on Diarrhoeal Diseases: Problems of Cited by:

References Aung Myo Han & Thein Hiaing (). Prevention of diarrhoea and dysentery by hand washing. Transactions of the Royal So- ciety of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 83, Blum, D. & Feachem, R. (). Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation investments on diarrhoeal dis- eases: problems of by: BLUM, D. & FEACHEM, R. G. () Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation investments on diarrhoeal diseases: problems of methodology. International journal of epidemiology, 12 (3): BOESCH, A. & SCHERTENLEIB, R. () Emptying on-site excreta disposal systems: field tests with mechanized equipment in Gaborone (Botswana).


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Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation investments on diarrhoeal diseases by Deborah Blum Download PDF EPUB FB2

Measuring the Impact of Water Supply and Sanitation Investments on Diarrhoeal Diseases: Problems of Methodology DEBORAH BLUM Ross Institute of Tropical by: Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation investments on diarrhoeal diseases: problems of methodology.

Blum D, Feachem RG. A review of the published literature on the impact of water supply and/or excreta disposal facilities on diarrhoeal diseases, or on infections related to diarrhoea, reveals several methodological problems that Cited by: Measuring the Impact of Water Supply and Sanitation Investments on Diarrhoeal Diseases: Problems of Methodology DEBORAH BLUM*t and RICHARD G FEACHEM* Blum D (Ross Institute of Tropical Hygiene, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street.

Int J Epidemiol. Sep;13(3) Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation on diarrhoeal diseases: problems of : James R Hebert, Donald R Miller.

Blum D, Feachem RG. Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation investments on diarrhoeal diseases: problems of methodology. Int J Epidemiol. Sep; 12 (3)– Barrell RA, Rowland MG. Infant foods as a potential source of diarrhoeal illness in rural West Africa.

Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. ; 73 (1)–Cited by: > Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation investment on diarrhoeal disease: problems of methodology R.G.

A review of the published literature on the impact of water supply and/or excreta disposal facilities on diarrhoeal diseases, or on infections related to diarrhoea, reveals several methodological problems that hamper the.

BLUM, D. & FEACHEM, R. () Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation investments on diarrhoeal diseases: problems of methodology. International journal of epidemiology, 12 (3) BOESCH A.

& SHERTENLEIB, R. () Emptying on-site excreta disposal systems: field tests with mechanized equipment in Gaborone (Botswana). diarrhoeal diseases. This focus on individual diseases did not prevent the development of comprehensive strategies.

The programmes on diarrhoeal diseases were directed towards prevention and proper clinical management. Cholera and other diarrhoeal diseases are a consequence of poverty, lack of adequate supply of potable water, deficient. The impact of water supply and sanitation on diarrhoea, related infections, nutritional status, and mortality is analysed by reviewing 67 studies from 28 countries.

The median reductions in diarrhoea morbidity rates are 22% from all studies and 27% from a few better-designed by: by diarrhoeal diseases by 65% and the morbidity by 26%. Improving water supply and sanitation is fundamental in breaking the vicious cycle of poverty, improving health and promoting economic and social development.

• million people, mostly children, die annually from water-related diseases. • Diarrhoeal diseases, including cholera. assessement of diarrhoeal disease attributable to water, sanitation and hygiene among under five in kasarani, nairobi county humphrey mbuti kimani p57/pt// a thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of the degree of master of Cited by: 1.

Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation investments on diarrhoeal diseases: problems of methodology. Int J Epidemiol ; – Briscoe, J, Feachem, RG, Rahaman, MM.

Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation facilities on diarrhoea morbidity: prospects for case-control methods. Author: Hebert JR, Journal: International journal of epidemiology[/09] Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation on diarrhoeal diseases: problems of : James R Hebert, Donald R Miller.

Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation investments on diarrhoeal diseases: problems of methodology. International Journal of Epidemiology, 12 (3), – Blum, D.

and Feachem, R. () ‘Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation investments on diarrhoeal diseases: Problems of methodology’, International Journal of Epidemiology, Vol, pp Boot, M.T.

and Cairncross, S. () Actions Speak. The study of hygiene behaviour in water and sanitation projects, IRC International. Abstract. This paper reviews the application of epidemiological understanding of diarrhoeal disease to interventions in water and sanitation.

Over the past 20 years, great efforts have been made to elucidate the relationships between water supply, sanitation and diarrhoeal by: Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation investments on diarrhoeal diseases: problems of methodology.

Int J Epidemiol. Sep; 12 (3)– Cousens SN, Feachem RG, Daniels DL. The use of nutritional status as a second outcome measure in case-control studies of environmental risk factors for diarrhoeal diseases.

Int J Epidemiol. Introduction. Diarrhoeal diseases kill an estimated million people each year.1 In developing countries diarrhoea accounts for 17% of deaths among under 5s.2 For the billion people who lack access to improved water supplies,3 and many more with contaminated water, diarrhoeal disease is highly endemic.

Nevertheless, the effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving the Cited by: Evaluating health impact: water supply, sanitation, and hygiene education It is generally agreed that improvements in water supply and sanitation have direct beneficial effects on community health.

This is especially relevant in developing countries where infant mortality and morbidity rates due to waterborne and water-related diseases are extremely high.

Diarrhoeal disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in less developed countries, especially among children aged under 5 years.1, 2 Since the seminal reviews of Esrey and colleagues in, and ,3, 4, 5 additional studies have been published on various water, hygiene, and sanitation-related interventions aimed at population health by:.

An impact of the project on diarrhoea morbidity was found only in limited sub-groups of the population. A greater association with water availability rather than quality was suggested for rates in young children. Measuring the impact of water supply and sanitation investments on diarrhoeal diseases: problems of methodology, Cited by: 1 Global Water Supply and Sanitation Assessment report - World Health Organization, Geneva/United Nations Children’s Fund, New York.

2 Millennium Development Goal Number 7, agreed at the United Nations Millennium Summit insets the target of halving the proportion of people without access to an improved source of drinking water bywhile the World Summit on .Impact indicators for measuring water and sanitation-related program performance:definitions,calculation,sources of data, issues,target values Percentage of children under of water used per capita per day Percentage of child caregivers and food preparers with appropriate handwashing behaviorCited by: